Palm Springs


Hold things lightly; plans fall apart and other unexpected plans arise and take me by surprise, but I try to remember to hold things lightly as they will likely change. So was my thought a year ago when I was asked to do a job in Palm Springs, a place I have always wanted to visit. Hold the hope lightly but I remembered jobs fall through (this happens all too often) and sometimes jobs and opportunities happen with no time for hope to even take place (ah Seoul still a shining memory). But I held the hope that this job might happen when people told me it might be canceled, I held it lightly as I talked to friends about possibly meeting me, I held lightly but was ready for the trip to not necessary take place. Pleasantly I was surprised the job worked out and I planned for the start of 2018 to be in Palm Springs.


I have always loved old Hollywood and the glamour and stories from a time past but held immortal in film and photos. I imagined Marilyn Monroe and the Rat Pack sitting beneath palm trees, next to ultra blue pools, amidst the mid-century modern houses of Palm Springs and wanted to visit. I extended my trip by two extra days and decided to spend one strolling the streets of Palm Springs and lazying by a pool with the beautiful book, THE BRIGHT HOUR. The other day I ventured out into the desert and to the awesome landscape of Joshua Tree.


It was amazing driving to Joshua Tree National Park and as I started to see a few of the Joshua Tree’s along the highway the other-worldly appearance by the side of the road felt unreal. The town of Joshua Tree with its bizarre and fabulous art including the Crochet Museum, and then I turned into the park and the views as I drove just continued to surprise and delight me. The occasional tree growing into fields filled with trees, the giant prehistoric rocks, and the vast vistas of dessert, rocks, and Joshua Tree’s with outstretched arms up to the blue sky.





My mom, sister, and stepfather used to come to the desert every spring, and I knew my mom felt the desert was a sacred place to her. As I drove I could imagine her sitting across from me, hand out the opened window with a slim cigarette dangling between her fingers. Walking among the giant boulders and down paths between cactuses I could imagine her smiling from ear to ear and looking skyward and saying how much she lovvvved the sun! Sitting amid the landscape she drew and spoke of so fondly I could hear her whisper how happy she was I was finally seeing this place. I felt honored to spend a day in a landscape that was humbling and inspiring in its natural wonder.





As I held this trip lightly things changed and as it turned out the two days were just me and the desert and a town I had always wanted to see. It was lovely and delivered what I had hoped for, I loved the small town feel of Palm Springs with the mountains in the backdrop. I loved the combination of being a part of nature and being able to end the day by a blue pool because that might just be who I am. I am grateful for the opportunity to have visited this place, and for the realization of the little hope held lightly for a year coming to fruition.


It was a brief visit but below are a few of the details I loved from my stay. I stayed at the Del Marcos Hotel and loved it, easy downtown location and friendly staff. I had some great meals at Cheekys, Jake’s, El Mirasol, and Natural Sisters Cafe in Joshua Tree.



02 2018

Crusty Baked Cauliflower with Farro from The Smitten Kitchen


As another year draws to an end and we look forward to a new one it is hard to also not look back on 2017. What a brutal year this past one has been for so very many people – with floods, fires, hurricanes, and these are only the natural pains not to count the current mood, one of collective sorrow and pain is at the forefront when I think of this past year. But there have also been glimmers of light between the dark days – the women’s march and the outcry of more people then has ever been witnessed in modern history; there have been friends and sighs of relief from individuals who overcame obstacles and healed; for me there were trips which is always a bright spot. As we approach the winter solstice and the darkest day of each year I always find it hard to also not find the hope and possibility that lingers in the vast dark that light has to reappear and that at this moment we can only transcend toward more light.

And on a lighter note (and slightly hungrier note) the other night I cooked what I realized was likely my favorite thing I cooked (and I did cook this on repeat) this past year. This is a recipe from Smitten Kitchen website and one she adapted from Ina Garten cookbook, and really in my mind that is the start of some really good kitchen pedigree. It starts with roasted cauliflower and mixes it with Farro, three kinds of cheese, capers, crushed red pepper flakes, sage, and lemon and bakes it to a crusty cheesy masterpiece. It is the perfect match of comfort and a unique zip from the things you mix in. It was perhaps the thing I made the most in 2017 and will be reappearing in the year to come.


Every hope that we can learn from the bruising pains this past year has brought so many of us (if not personally) then universally. May this moment be the one that brings the return of light. And may we have more moments filled with delicious cheese and baked goodness in 2018.


Crusty Baked Cauliflower with Farro from The Smitten Kitchen


1 cup dried Farro

3 cups water or broth



Olive Oil

2 ¼ – 2 ½ pound cauliflower cut into small florets

2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage

2 tablespoons capers drained

2 large cloves of garlic minced

½ teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

Crushed red pepper flakes to taste

2 cups Fontina cheese shredded

½ cup ricotta

½ cup panko breadcrumbs

1/3 cup grated pecorino romano cheese or parmigiano (I use whatever I have at the time)

  • Cook farro. If you think ahead and plan you can presoak the farro overnight in 3 cups of liquid and then only cook for 10 minutes of simmering until tender and then drain. With less planning simply simmer in liquid for about 30 minutes until most of the liquid is absorbed and the grains are tender. Drain any excess liquid.
  • While farro is cooking heat the oven to 425°F. Drizzle the olive oil over cauliflower and toss with salt and pepper and spread florets in one even layer on a cookie sheet. Roast for 20 min until lightly browned and tender, checking it half way through the baking time and turning pieces over.
  • Reduce the heat to 400°
  • Assemble the casserole. In a large bowl add the sage, capers, garlic, lemon zest, red pepper 1 teaspoon salt and black pepper to cauliflower and farro and stir to combine. Stir in the fontina cheese. Taste at this stage to see if you need more salt or pepper or capers etc.
  • Transfer half of the mixture to a greased 10 inch ovenproof baking dish. Dollop rounded tablespoons of ricotta all over casserole. Sprinkle the remaining cauliflower farro mixture over the ricotta leaving pockets of it undisturbed.
  • In a small bowl mix the breadcrumbs with the pecorino cheese and 1 tablespoon olive oil until evenly mixed. Sprinkle over the entire casserole.
  • Bake for 20 min until browned and crusty on top. Serve with a green salad and enjoy.



12 2017

Morning Glory Oats


Today was the first day of snow this year here in Brooklyn; and earlier this week I returned from a long work trip followed by a lovely weekend visit with my sister. I am also at the tail end of a fierce cold, and today felt like the first day in months with no plans or necessary immediate errands. I always feel like with snow falling outside my windows I have every excuse to stay in bed a little longer, to curl up with books and TV…and well hibernate for a while. I went for a short walk through the gentle white flakes and breathed in the crisp clean snowy air. Then I came home and made the most delicious morning glory oats, because to me snow also feels like an excuse to keep my kitchen and stomach warm.

I have always been a fan of morning glory muffins – the earthy carrot, the spicy notes of cinnamon and ginger, the burst from currants or raisins, all tucked into a slightly sweet bite. Also I have always been a big fan of steel cut oats – the chewy bite of the oats and the warm comfort holding the bowl in my hands in the morning. When I came across this recipe that combined these two into one breakfast that might actually be more delicious then the two individual things I loved I knew immediately that I would return to this recipe over and over again on snowy, or rainy ,or well any kind of morning.


Morning Glory Oats adapted from Whole Grain Mornings and Joy The Baker


3 cups water

1 cup any milk of choice, plus extra for serving

1 cup steel-cut oats

1 cup grated carrots (about 2 medium carrots)

1/2 cup currants or raisins

3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

2 tablespoons light brown sugar (I like to use turbinado or raw sugar in this recipe)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes

2 teaspoons grated orange zest

  • In a saucepan, bring the water and milk to a gentle boil. Stir in the oats, carrots, currants, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, brown sugar, vanilla, and salt and return to a boil.
  • Decrease the heat to low and partially cover.
  • Cook the oats stirring just once or twice until it begins to thicken and the oats are soft yet chewy, 25 to 30 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the coconut flakes and orange zest. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes before serving.
  • Serve warm with toasted almonds and extra milk as desired.
  • Makes 4 servings. I like to make this and then keep leftovers and reheat each morning with some additional milk. 



12 2017

Berlin & Copenhagen


Some places just feel like home from the very first moment. Some places feel familiar and comforting and put you at immediate ease. Growing up in a home that was part Jewish I never thought about Germany in that way, the history and stories that filled so much of our culture made it seem possibly foreboding and threatening. I did of course despite that partly Jewish home also go to a grammar school firmly rooted in an old German foundation with its very German philosophies (my mother was nothing less then a contradiction in every sense – it was her choice to send me to the school and when I would diligently practice the required German she would look at me and say don’t speak German in this house). At school we learned German songs, we studied the very rich and diverse history of that part of the world, we celebrated holidays in a very German fashion with Christmas markets and advent circles, with May days and a Maypole, with special and magical visits from Saint Nicholas who left our shoes filled with oranges and small gifts.

Years ago when I first arrived in Berlin I felt it, immediately that same feeling wash over me of returning home, of being surrounded by the familiar, and put at ease at how much things made sense to me there. I always attribute it to my education and the young formidable mind but I also know it might go deeper, it is the friends I have there, it is a place that reminds me of how I grew up and in an odd way Berlin echos San Francisco to me. But I think it is more,  I remember the first time I went to Germany with reservations it all felt so much – the history, the stories, the very real ghosts, but what I found was a city that doesn’t turn away from any of that but has folded it beautifully into itself. I am always moved at how Berlin a city once decimated has decided not to just rebuild but to honor that which was destroyed – building modern structures on the base of ancient and historic structures to become new and more beautiful, how they leave whispers of their history everywhere you turn as opposed to erasing and ignoring them. I love the way the past and present and future interweave. And as someone who is partly Jewish I feel more connected to my roots and the millions of stories irrevocably connected in and to this place.


Last month I returned to Berlin for a weekend visit with friends. I love how when I arrive at Tegel I am always flooded with the same feeling of having returned to a place that I am happy to be reunited with. I spent my weekend with friends walking the streets, talking, laughing, and remembering how much I love this city. We ate home made soup followed by the remains of sparkling wine from a previous night, followed by coffee, followed by tea. We climbed bell towers and watched the sun set. I saw parts of the wall I never visited and thought about a history so complex it only seems harder to understand on each visit as my friends tell me stories of their childhoods and their families. On this trip I kept seeing and stumbling over the Stolperstein along the street that honor where victims of the Holocaust where last known to live or work. I can never return to Berlin without somehow feeling more then I did when I arrived.



After my weekend in Berlin I traveled to meet my friend Gina in Copenhagen a city and country I have always wanted to visit. We spent the most wonderful few days walking the streets, taking boat rides along canals from Nyhavn. We saw the stature of the Little Mermaid that graced one of my childhood books and always captured my imagination. We went to Freetown Christiana and saw how a culture can live apart but within another.







A few years ago my father and my god mother both recommended that I start to watch the Danish TV show Borgen and it quickly became one of my favorite TV shows. I loved the characters, I loved the way they dealt with issues like sexism and politics and the darkness in our world. The characters felt to me like fully complex friends who I both loved and respected but also could see some of their stumbling points. It was so wonderful to be in the city that plays such a large role in the show and walk the streets and see the sights from the show. One day to escape the rain we even went to Cafe Wilder from the show and enjoyed our Smorrebrod and sat until the rain had passed. It felt like living in the show I so admired.






On our last day we ventured into the Danish countryside and took the train north to the town of Helsingør and the home of the castle that is supposedly the setting for the play Hamlet. It was amazing and changed how I thought about the play to walk the old wood rooms of the castle and look out to a gray sea under a cloudy sky. It changed how I read lines about the mists and will forever impact how I see and think of one of my favorite plays. While in the charming town of Helsingør we saw that Sweden and the town of Helsingborg was close, so close in fact a ferry went every hour. And in a truly spontaneous moment Gina and I decided to take the ferry and go to Helsingborg for a short visit and a coffee. It was incredible to see how close the two cities both are and how different.





On our train ride back into Copenhagen we stopped at the amazing Louisiana Museum for one of the most amazing art experiences of my life. Set in a small Danish town and overlooking the sea and on a clear day with views to Sweden is a museum that truly must be seen and experienced in life. A sculpture garden outside so that each view from within and outside the museum feels perfectly curated and composed. Space to breath and take in the art and let the experience of art wash over and saturate you. We saw the brave exhibit by Marina Abramovic and the singular experience of standing within Kusama’s installation Gleaming Lights Of the Souls. It all felt like the most wonderful and rewarding experience.






Some places immediately feel like home and others make you want to change how you see the world, they open your eyes and they touch your soul. It is never lost on me how fortunate I am to travel as extensively as I have in my life. It is a commitment I made to myself on a hilltop in Tuscany and it is one that has continued to be one of the most important things in my life. To continue to see the world (both near and far). To not be afraid of that which is different then me. To challenge my preconceived notions and be willing to learn from my experiences. To see that no one country or people has everything. The world is complex and diverse and as it may seem smaller it might be more important then ever to both move together to learn from other cultures while holding onto each individual cultures heritage, history, the stories, the perspectives. Travel opens my eyes to myself and to the world. It is the greatest gift I have ever been given and in large part is the gift I continue to give myself, and hope I always will.



10 2017

Gluten-Free Blueberry Oat Muffins


This summer has flown by in a speedy blur, its been good with multiple beach days, an afternoon at a friend’s lake house, yoga in the park, the eclipse, adventures both near and further a far (and another on the very near horizon). As a kid my summer’s seemed to extend through what felt like the most wonderful weeks of trips to the farm, camping at Mt Lassen and Big Sur, and trips to Lake Tahoe; the days and weeks felt long and time before returning to school felt like epic seasons of fun. Today summer’s feel like they end just as they start but the years too seem to speed by faster then I can even understand where May, June, July, and August have gone.

But as all of these weeks have continued to march by there is one thing that I did enjoy more then most other things this summer – blueberries. For me it felt like perhaps it was the summer of blueberries, they were so very sweet and delicious, the farmers market seemed to be adorned with the blue juicy jewels and every week I went back for more. I ate them – one, two, three just like Sal in the classic children’s book, as I walked home from the market; I ate them over yogurt, in pancakes, with chia pudding, in smoothies, in salads, any way I could. I am rather surprised I myself did not turn into a giant blueberry like Violet in Willy Wonka. On the last week that the market seemed to be filled with the plenitude of this summer’s blueberries I made what may be my favorite thing all summer, these-gluten free oat blueberry muffins.


I have made my share of blueberry muffins over the years (some healthy, others less so) but I always felt like there was nothing to shout about, a little too sweet, not blueberry forward enough for me, and just lacking in the something special that would make me return and return to a recipe. But because I like blueberries and muffins I have never given up and kept looking and trying recipes. I found this recipe on Skinny taste and loved it! Its not too sweet, full of the blueberry flavor I love and somehow complimented by the oats, it walks the fine line of delicious and healthy. And I loved them! I made these gluten-free because I had some gluten-free flour left over from baking for a friend, but you could make these with regular flour and they would be just as delightful.

Another summer may be approaching its close but the long days and the memories will stay with me, plus I have a few of these muffins frozen for a nice fall day to recall the bounty of this summer and to relive the splendor of all of those blue beauties that I enjoyed.


Gluten-Free Blueberry Oat Muffins from Skinny Taste

1 1/2 cups quick gluten free oats
1 cup unsweetened almond milk
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 tbsp honey
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 large egg whites
1 tbsp coconut or canola oil
1 tsp vanilla extract
2/3 cup Bobs Red Mill Gluten Free 1 to 1 Baking Flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup fresh blueberries

  • Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a muffin tin with muffin liners.
  • Place oats in a food processor or chopper and pulse a few times. (I didn’t have time for this step so I just soaked the oats directly and I liked it fine). Soak oats in milk for about 30 minutes.
  • In a medium bowl combine brown sugar, honey, apple sauce, vanilla, egg whites, oil and mix well.
  • In a third bowl combine flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda and whisk to combine.
  • Combine oats and milk with sugar, applesauce mixture and mix well.
  • Slowly add in the dry ingredients and mix until just incorporated. Fold in blueberries.
  • Spoon into the muffin tin and bake for 22-24 minutes.



08 2017

Beauty All Around Me – Grand Canyon & Zion


“ With beauty before me may I walk.
With beauty behind me may I walk.
With beauty below me may I walk.
With beauty above me may I walk.
With beauty all around me may I walk.”
~ Navajo Blessing

For all the many countries and parts of the world I have traveled to I have always been slightly remiss in not traveling around my own country of America. It was not for a lack of interest or curiosity but it always seemed so close and other places seemed so far and I figured someday I would get around to seeing my own back yard. I have driven cross country in a blurry rush just after 9/11 when planes were still grounded, I have seen cities from coast to coast and some in the great expanse of the center; but when my German or European friends would inquire about our countries wonders like the Grand Canyon or our National Parks I would have to humbly admit to never having been. That was of course until recently.



I worked a job in Las Vegas last month and I had the idea to finally take the road trip to see the Grand Canyon, the trip happened to coincide with my father’s 70th birthday and I invited him to join me on the road trip. We decided to center our weekend trip around the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and a trip to Zion National Park. For as many places as I have visited nothing could prepare me for the views of this weekend, for the enormity of vistas, for the wide land and majestic red monuments towering, the light and how it moved and changed and gave each view an entirely new appearance.





We hiked along steep cliffs and over smooth and ancient red rock formations, we drove and sang to the radio, we learned more about Navajo culture and were reminded how rich and complicated (and often overlooked) our history in this country is. I was left speechless at the beauty all around me in Zion and felt inadequate in gratitude to nature and our National Parks. I promised myself I would return and that I would also try to explore more of the beautiful places (especially our other National Parks).



I returned home to last week’s news out of Charlottesville and feel so sad that the news just seems to become more and more bleak if that could even be possible. Our country is large, it is diverse, it is beautiful, but it also holds a history that we need to address and admit to or we perpetuate it. We have some of the most beautiful nature I have ever seen but we risk losing it because we have learned to not look at it, or appreciate it, or recognize how important it is. We walk in beauty all around us but we threaten to destroy it ourselves. We must look and see the beauty that is around us and work to preserve it, but we must also call out and protest that which is not our proudest moments (both in history and today) and work to recognize and rectify the wrongs.




I discovered walking beneath the red caverns of Zion and viewing the wild deer and goats that I need not travel so far from home to view beauty and wonder (although I will continue to travel as far as I can) because there is beauty before me, behind me, above me, below me, and all around me.



08 2017


IMG_0367“It is not in the starts to hold our destiny but in ourselves” ~ William Shakespeare

For as much of a Shakespeare fan as I am I have only found this quote recently and rather loved it. And in these long days of summer, of work and life in this strange and off kilter world we all find ourselves existing in here are a few other things I have loved.

I read all of these books recently and loved them and found I was so happy and moved to be a part of each page I read.

HOMEGOING – one of the most beautiful series of unfolding interconnected stories told by extraordinary characters.

OPTION B – because resilience is something we have to keep working with and towards in life.

LOVE WARRIOR – powerful book about love that made me examine the stories we tell in our society about men and women and relationships and the courage to form our own lives and stories and relationships.

I also loved this short film JOE’S VIOLIN about the power of music to heal; a holocaust survivor who shared his violin with an inner city girl in the Bronx and the bond it formed.

I was lucky enough to go and see INDECENT on Broadway and it was one of the most spectacular and unique plays I have seen in years that speaks to the power of art and how much it matters in our world and history.

On a recent call with my sister she asked me what I did to take care of myself and she reminded me of what I had told her once, that we all need to take care of ourselves. This simple chia pudding is what I have been eating these last weeks to take care of myself and loving each bite. I found chia puddings only this past year but once I discovered them I have not been able to stop eating them. They are fast to put together (less then 5 min), don’t take many ingredients, and are a healthy delicious way to start the long summer days.




¼ cup chia seeds

¾ cup milk of your choice (I like almond, soy, coconut or a combination of any of these)

a pinch cardamom

toasted coconut flakes

nut of choice (I like toasted almonds or walnuts)

fruit of choice (I like berries and banana but also have loved it with mango or nectarine or peach, whatever looks good or that you happen to have on hand)

  • In a bowl or mason jar combine chia seeds, milk, cardamom. Stir for a couple of minutes until well combined and starting to thicken.
  • Let sit in fridge overnight or up to 48 hours. Before serving stir and add fruit and nuts as desired.



07 2017

Luisa Weiss’s Simple German Rhubarb Cake with Streusel


The world and news has seemed awfully bitter this week. Yesterday I inadvertently stumbled back upon John Lennon’s song Give Me Some Truth and as I listened to it and I kept hitting repeat and finding how eerily and aptly it seems to fit our current times. I think it needs a resurgence – singers should be bringing this back into their repertoire plus it seemed a perfect song for sing a long at any political gathering where health care is being discussed!

“I’m sick and tired of hearing things
from uptight, short-sighted, narrow-minded hypocritics
All I want is the truth
Just gimme some truth
I’ve had enough of reading things
By neurotic, psychotic, pig-headed politicians
All I want is some truth
Just gimme some truth”

I ask is the truth too much to ask for these days? But the thing that is amazing is this song also appears on the same album as Imagine and its hard to not listen to one and then the other and recognize it as 2 sides of the coin – one side demanding truth in a broken world and the other hoping and imagining for a better world we could create together.

“Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion, too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace….

You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will be as one”

That was the genius of John Lennon the ability to see and say things about our bitter world and critic it but still dream of a sweeter world and express his hope. It is the thing about life it can be sour but that sourness is what makes the sweet  shine through.

The sour sweet combination is one I have always loved (I love contradictions!). As a kid I enjoyed Sweet Tarts candies and the way they would make my mouth and cheeks pucker at first and then revel in the sweet with each small pastel candy. As an adult I love it in other places but one of my favorite ways to enjoy the tart and sweet at this time of year is in rhubarb.


I took a walk through the park on Saturday and after a few days of rain and gray the sky was blue and the air smelled of sweet fresh green grass, a favorite smell of mine and one that especially in New England always makes me happy. The farmers market had huge piles of green/pink rhubarb and I knew that I had to bake it into something sweet and I had just the recipe.


This recipe comes from Luisa Weiss’s CLASSIC GERMAN BAKING for her Rhabarber Streuselkuchen (Simple Rhubarb Cake with Streusel top). It is the perfect vehicle for rhubarb – a simple delicate and only slightly sweet cake. Just as it is the complexity of John Lennon to sing both Gimme Some Truth and Imagine when you take the sour rhubarb and sink it into a sweet cake covered in streusel and then top it with an only slightly sweet whipped cream you find that the sour and sweet in life work well when we can see and hold and taste them both together. This cake was so delicious I brought it to a friends house and everyone enjoyed it.
Here is to both the sweet and sour in life and here is to hopefully more truth always and never ending capacity to imagine.



Luisa Weiss’s Simple German Rhubarb Cake with Streusel


¾ cups all purpose flour

½ cup granulated sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

7 tablespoons butter softened

½ cups almonds ground or chopped optional

  • In a large bowl combine all of the ingredients and working with your fingers rub flour and butter into the size of small lima beans or a pea. Set Streusel aside until after the cake has been assembled.


1 pound rhubarb trimmed

¾ cup granulated sugar

7 tablespoons butter

2 eggs

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Grated peel of ½ lemon

1-1/2 cups scooped leveled all purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ cup whole milk

  • Preheat oven to 350° F. Line 10-inch cake pan or I used an 8×11 pan with parchment paper, letting the sides hang over the edge to function as a sling.
  • Chop rhubarb into ½ inch pieces and toss with 2 tablespoons of sugar. Set aside.
  • In a mixing bowl cream together butter and remaining 1/2 cup  sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Then beat in the vanilla extract and grated lemon peel.
  • In a separate bowl sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Beat half the mixture into the butter mixture, and then beat in the milk. Continue to beat in remaining flour mixture until well combined.
  • Scrape the batter into the prepared pan, distributing it evenly.
  • Scatter the rhubarb over the batter and press it lightly into the batter. It will seem like a lot of rhubarb, but Luisa promises its just right, and it is.
  • Sprinkle streusel evenly over top.
  • Bake  for 65-70 min until batter has puffed up and streusel is golden brown.
  • Cool the cake on a rack. Serve cake at room temperature or cold the next day with a generous dollop of Whipped Cream or as my mom would say “Mit schlag”


1 cup whipping cream

2 teaspoons granulated sugar

  • Beat with an electric mixer until the cream is stiff. 




05 2017

Super Green Spring Smoothie

IMG_2935Spring has been a tease this year. With cherry blossoms and a seemingly endless pink profusion of flowers, with blue skies one day and thunderstorms and heavy rains the next, with days of warm weather followed by freezing days when my buildings noisy heat kicks back in. It feels like an ebb and flow of spring and then not spring but the promise always along the edge of what might come soon with warm days and nights.


As for me I have been busy with work and my usual spring projects. A few people have recently mentioned they had noticed I haven’t posted anything here lately and I admitted that life and work had been keeping me busy the last few months (and that is not necessarily a bad thing). I used to feel so conflicted about this space and what to do after an absence or what to say when I had fallen off of the cycle of checking in. I felt it necessary to keep checking in and then when life got in the way I would feel guilty and stay away because I felt like I had no excuse and no way to slide gently back into the routine or pattern of what this space is to me – a place to be somewhat creative, to share what I am thinking/feeling/doing and in many cases all of the above. But in the time I have been away I have not only worked I have also had a milestone birthday and don’t feel the same need to apologize as much. I want to be in this space as often as I can but sometimes things get in the way, and my life in better balance might mean just picking back up where I left off without any need for explaining, not to others but to myself. I don’t have to explain to myself why things at times lie fallow even though I wish they didn’t and I don’t need to have a reason to pick them back up, perhaps its just what I do let things go and then pick them back up when time allows.

So in this new decade of my life and with my last few min of time off before diving back into work tomorrow morning here’s to less excuses and a recipe for my favorite green smoothie!

Happy sipping and with every hope I will be back very, very soon.



Super Green Smoothie
1 Banana
1 cup fresh baby spinach rinsed
1 cup light coconut milk
1/3 cup cold water (more or less depending on desired texture)

Blend all ingredients in blender until smooth and to the texture you like. Sip and enjoy, so easy and delicious! Happy Spring.

Makes 2 smoothies



05 2017

April Bloomfield’s English Porridge


New York City and the East Coast is tucked in under a layer of snow that continues to fall hour after hour. It’s the perfect day for slowly working, reading in bed, countless cups of tea, and the perfect bowl of Oatmeal!

I grew up eating a ritual of overly sweetened oatmeal made in enormous 60 quart heavy pots, bursting with plump raisins and spooned hundreds of times each morning before my carpool would pick me up from the breakfast shift at Martin de Porres where I worked along side my mom. At home I never remember eating oatmeal but rather the smooth even bowls of Farina cream of wheat. As an adult I have experimented with oatmeal of many varieties – instant in college, quick cooking for years, steel cut with its hearty bite, and cold oats in the summer, but all of my hot bowls of oatmeal have left me wanting something, that is until recently.


All of my oatmeal dreams came true in one recipe from April Bloomfield, its not complicated, doesn’t take much time, and ultimately changed how I look and feel about my morning bowl of oats. I have loved this warm and hearty bowl of oats a combination of both rolled oats and steel cut leaves a consistency both soft and smooth with just the right amount of bite and give between the teeth. Cooking them in milk and water makes them richer and more flavorful. I have made them lightly sweetened at times or completely unsweetened at other times; I have finished them with a slick of syrup, or some berries, or a banana and peanut butter, or completely on their own. The recipe makes 2-3 servings and I like to make it and then warm up each bowl on the following mornings. Sometimes the easiest things are the best things.

I hope you are warm, dry, and if you are lucky I hope you will be able to snuggle down and eat a bowl of these oats in the very near future.




April Bloomfield’s English Porridge from Food 52


1½ cups of milk (any kind of milk – I have used coconut, almond, soy, and dairy and they are all great) 

1½ cups of water

1½ teaspoons salt

½ cup rolled oats

½ cup steel-cut oats

Optional – about 2 tablespoons of sugar during cooking process

  • Combine the milk, water, and salt in a saucepan and set over high heat. As soon as liquid comes to a gentle simmer, add both kinds of oats and lower heat to low.
  • Cook the oats at a steady simmer, stirring frequently and lowering the heat as necessary to maintain the simmer but not bubble over.
  • After about 20 min the rolled oats will have turned soft and almost melted, while the steel cut oats will be tender and have the slightest bite, and all of the liquid will have been absorbed.
  • If you wish to sweeten the entire pot of oats use 2 tablespoons of sugar when you add the oats.
  • Finish with berries, banana, nuts, maple syrup, or anything that makes you happy.



03 2017